Is this the American ideal we’re supposed to defend?

My "favorite" comment on the thread sampled below was the suggestion that one was not American for disapproving of the supposed actions.

I shouldn't be surprised. I know from history that Americans objectify our enemies in order to build support and momentum for warfare. We did it in the Revolution. We did it in the years we fought the Native Americans.  We did it when we fought the Germans, the Japanese, the Koreans, and the Vietnamese.

We even conducted witch hunts among our own populace during the Cold War.  We continue that trend to this very day by associating people of certain political ideals with the very same Cold War enemy.  It even extends to attacks on religious ideals or lack thereof.

We're coming off as nothing better than schoolyard bullies.

Is this the American ideal we're supposed to defend?

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Memorial Day 2011

“In Flanders Fields”
Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD, Canadian Army (1872-1918)

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

History of “In Flanders Fields” via Arlington Cemetery

“Poppies in the Sunset on Lake Geneva” by Eric Hill, under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license via Wikipedia

The Time to Celebrate Is Not This One

On May 1, 2011, President Barack Obama reported that al-Qaeda terrorist leader Osama bin Laden was officially dead. Rumors suggest that SEAL Team Six was the end of the line for the man who planned and orchestrated the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the defeated attack on Washington, DC. The President suggests that this is a turning point in the nearly decade long global war on terror that is no longer called the Global War on Terror, and that this event is long-awaited justice for those innocents killed in what has become known as this generation’s Pearl Harbor moment.

So why don’t I feel like celebrating?

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